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biography


Tom Liam Lynch

Professor, Writer, Speaker, Consultant

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biography


Tom Liam Lynch

Professor, Writer, Speaker, Consultant

Tom Liam Lynch is Assistant Professor of Educational Technology at Pace University in Manhattan.  A former English teacher and school district official for the New York City Department of Education, Tom led the implementation of a $50M online/blended learning program in over 100 schools called iLearnNYC.  He also designed and guided the initial implementation of WeTeachNYC, a digital resource repository and learning environment for the city’s 80,000 teachers. Tom’s research sits at the intersection of software theory and English education. Currently, he is examining the relationship between K-12 computer science and literacy.  His book The Hidden Role of Software in Educational Research: Policy to Practice was released by Routledge in 2015. Other publications appear in leading academic journals, including Berkeley Review of Education, Research in the Teaching of English, Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy, English Journal, and Changing English.

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experience


experience


experience

2012 to Present

Assistant Professor of Educational Technology, Pace University, School of Education. Co-director of Babble Lab: A center for digital humanities pedagogy and research. Researching the application of software theory to educational research, with an emphasis on literacy practices, education reform, teacher education, and K-12 computer science education. Coordinator of Educational Technology Specialist program.

2012 to Present

Consultant. Working with select educational organizations to identify technology needs areas in order to strategize and implement solutions that honor the complexity of teaching and learning. Clients include Institute of Play and Intel.

2012 to 2015

Adviser, New York City Department of Education (Division of Teaching and Learning). Strategized, designed, and supported the implementation of a large-scale online/blended professional development ecosystem for the district’s 80,000 teachers. Secured $5M in philanthropic funding.

2012

Innovative Literacies Specialist, New York City Department of Education (Division of Academics and Performance). Supported the city’s teachers in understanding and integrating the Common Core literacy standards. Designed and piloted technology-supported approaches to large-scale online professional development. Secured $1.8M in philanthropic funding.

2009 to 2011

Director of Implementation, New York City Department of Education (Division of Talent, Labor, and Innovation). Led a team of 10 implementation managers in supporting over 100 schools implement online learning models with K-12 students as part of iLearnNYC, an initiative in the district’s Innovation Zone (iZone). Brokered conversations between IT teams and educational business owners. Implementation Manager for first six months. 

English Teacher and Education Technology Coordinator, New York City Lab School for Collaborative Studies. Designed project-based learning experiences for and with 9th and 12th grade students.  Coached colleagues in the use of instructional technologies and advised school leadership on technology strategy for instruction, operations, and communications.

2003 to 2009

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select publications


select publications


select publications

 

Behizadeh, N. & Lynch, T.L. (in press).  Righting technology: Theoretical misalignment and technological underperformance of large-scale writing assessment. Berkeley Review of Education.

Lynch, T.L. (2016). Below the screen: Why multiliteracies research needs to embrace software. English Journal, 106(3), 92-94.

Gerber, H. & Lynch, T.L.  (2016). Into the meta: Research methods for moving beyond social media surfacing. Tech Trends, DOI: 10.1007/s11528-016-0140-6.

Lynch, T.L. (2016). Letters to the machine: Why computer programming belongs in the English classroom. English Journal, 105(5), 95-97.

Lynch, T. L. (2015). Where the machine stops: Software as reader and the rise of new literatures. Research in the Teaching of English, 49(3), 297-304.

Lynch, T. L. (2015). Software's smile: A critical software analysis of an educational technology specialist program. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 15(4), 600-616.

Lynch, T. L. (2014). The imponderable bloom: A multimodal social semiotic study of the role of software in teaching literature in a secondary online English course.  Changing English, 21(1), 42-52.